A London based artists recently used our products for their latest bright idea and we were happy to help

Aphra Shemza LED art exhibit

As well as the more ‘standard’ uses for our products we also like to talk about projects that use LED lighting which are more, how shall we say, outside of the box?

Well, an illuminating creation we were recently able to provide assistance with could certainly be described as that.

We were contacted by London based artist Aphra Shemza who works with multi-media, light art, kinetic sculpture and interactive installation who came to us for help with her latest piece.

Aphra Shemza LED art piece close up

Aphra’s work focuses on abstract, geometric and scientific research and often involves technology to translate these concepts to an audience. She was in need of some of our Mini aluminium profile for a piece called Synphonica 0.1, which is a prototype for a much larger sound reactive piece she plans to make next year for a light art exhibition.

Mini aluminium Channel is more commonly used for small detailed design solutions to house 8mm wide tape while the recessed flat aluminium channels also allows for a flush install into grooves and prevents unwanted secondary refraction from reflective surfaces; but on this occasion it was required for a stunning piece of artwork.

Aphra Shemza LED art piece close up

“I needed the profiles quickly as I was running to a tight deadline,” explains Aphra. “Ultra LEDs delivered just what I needed when they said they would, meaning I was able to finish the piece on time.”

Since graduating in 2012, Aphra Shemza’s work has been seen at exhibitions in and around London and she often displays her creations with Kinetica Museum and the Lights of Soho gallery.

Aphra has also been featured in a number of publications and press both on the internet and in print, most notably Tate Etc, GQ Magazine and Time Out.

You can view the creation in all it’s glory on Aphra’s website, it’s named: Synphonica 0.1, by Aphra Shemza, 2016
Words: Matthew Crist | Photography: Tony Manola